Tag Archives: Soviet Union

24 Years Later on a Golden Path: The Generation Born to Independence

I should start with a rather hearty congratulations sent out to every Armenian out there. Armenia is officially 24 years old, as of September 21, 1991. It is an incredible feeling really and I am more than just a little excited to see how the country will mark its 25th anniversary in the upcoming year.

While it may not seem like the country is very old (we have gone through so many regimes, changes in power and a mega metamorphosis over the years, making the multi-millennium old country appear no older than a mere teenager), it is clear that it is maturing at a very fast pace. Ups and downs put aside, this is a country where the most incredible things are happening every day, if only you know where to look. We are transforming into such a pretty butterfly, but one that lives for an eternity, not the type that dies within a few days. We will have our Golden Age come soon, a renaissance of sorts that will sweep the nation. First, however, we need the Independence Generation to mature a little more. They are, after all, a mere 24 years old, born in the days of homes quashed and rivers of sorrow. This is the generation that will bring about the best years this country has ever seen for they have nothing to compare with. These are the heroes of our future, the leaders who do not look back on Soviet days long gone, but to a bright and incredibly inspirational future. They are the seedlings who will bud into the most fragrant of roses, with thorns to warn off those who seek to overthrow their rule.

This brings to mind the tale of Vartevar and how the tears of Asdghig gave rise to roses thus healing the world of its sorrow, pain, anger and jealousy. The sun shines really bright these days really, brighter still than when I first move in 2013, years ago. The sun is warmer, the sky clearer and it appears that the blossoming roses are truly giving rise to a nation of positive energy, hardworking and beautiful, with a love for each other and their country that overflows from their hearts. It appears the tyrant has been slain and Asdghig’s tears turn to that of happiness, knowing that her own love has found roots in the generation born to independence. And who better to beam with pride than her lover, Vahagn, the very essence of the sun?

Independence is hard to come by but we have brought it about twice in the past 100 years. In 1918 we proved that we are ready to be free, to govern our own people in our own nation, without having to kneel. We brushed off our knees and stood tall, a feat that many could not have imagined being achieved only years before. In 1991 we once again joined hand in hand to ensure we have a nation, to ensure we save our language, our culture, our identities. We gave the vote that was overwhelming, nearly unanimous in the call for freedom from foreign regimes. We snatched our future from the hands of those who would have devoured us and thus paved our destinies with gold. Only, we failed to notice the value of the ground we walked on as we trudged forwards, forgetting that beyond the dirt, the grime, the sorrow and death was glittering warmth and a wealth that would be irreplaceable. Some failed to see because they kept looking backwards, some because they only looked to the sky. Today, however, that path is clearing, the snow is melting, the ice has become nearly nonexistent. There are still those who look back, still those who have yet to notice the gold on the ground because they are too busy looking up or to the sides where the same path does not exist, but the youth, the well-read and well-rounded, the generation belonging to the days of independence knows the truth. The sky is blue, the sun shines bright and just ahead of us the road is clear once more, the golden shimmer mirror the proud rays of the sun. The old gods and the new rejoice because Armenia is becoming whole once more, one steady step at a time. Now is the time before the rise of the Golden age and those who remain, those who dare to dream and can see beyond the fog, they will be the ones to create what will be the foundation for a new Armenia.

Happy Independence Day to our dearest homeland. May your Golden Age rival that of the most esteemed of countries in the world. May your children forever feel the call of the mountains you cave created to protect your land. And most of all, may the Independence Generation grow to become the most awe-inspiring and magnanimous of rulers, known for bringing peace and prosperity to our lands. Happy Independence Day and may you stay free for all the centuries and millennia to come!

Advertisements

Armenian Martial Arts

During the Soviet Union, Kokh began to fall out of usage. Until at least 1988 Kokh has been practiced in the rural areas of Armenia. The popular Soviet combat system Sambo, was intensely influenced by the Armenian Kokh. Today modest attempts are made to preserve this ancient Armenian martial art.

There exist two main types of Kokh, one known as “Lori Kokh” the other “Shirak Kokh”. The main difference between the two styles concern grabbing rules and outfit. In Shirak Kokh wrestlers are topless wearing only traditional Armenian pants and are allowed to grab the legs of the opponent. In Lori Kokh, fighters wear traditional robes and have to grab the opponents robe to throw or push them out. In the ancient times Kokh was common during weddings. Two fighters from the sides of the bride and groom would wrestle each other.

Rules:

The person who first throws the opponent on his back (thus performing the “kokh”) without boosting and/or turning him, wins. The victor has to hold the opponent to the ground by pressing with his knee. Pushing the opponent out of the mat, which has a radius of 7-9 meters,[5] also results in winning. Although there is no time limit, a Kokh fight usually lasts from 5 to 10 minutes. Every fight starts with a ceremonial warm-up dance, lasting for at least half a minute. The fights are always accompanied by traditional Armenian folk music. According to the rules, after a successful victory, on request of the public, judges and participants the winner has to perform a traditional victory dance.

 

 

Sources:

Green, ed. by Thomas A. (2001). Martial arts of the world : en encyclopedia. Santa Barbara, Calif.: ABC-CLIO. p. 718. ISBN 9781576071502.

(Russian) Tyshler, edited by F.P Suslov, D.A. (2001). “Кох (Kokh)”. Terminologiia sporta : tolkovyĭ slovarʹ sportivnykh terminov : okolo 9500 terminov. Moscow: “SportAkademPress”. pp. 480. ISBN 5-8134-0047-8.

Wolfgang Decker, Wolfgang x (2007). Festschrift für Wolfgang Decker zum 65. Geburtstag.. Hildesheim: Weidmann. p. 224. ISBN 9783615003406.

Countries and Territories of the World: Volume II – Middle East & The Caucasus. p. 582

(Armenian) Ispiryan, Mikayel (1984). Մարզանունների բացատրական բառարան [Dictionary of Sports]. Yerevan: Hayastan. p. 68.

Marshal Hovhannes Baghramian

Marshal Ivan (Hovhannes) Khatchaduri Baghramian was born in 1897 in the village of Chartakhlu, Armenia, 1897. He was educated in Tbilisi, Georgia. In 1915, he volunteered in Russian army, fighting for the Bolsheviks and in 1921, the Sovietisation of Lori and Georgia. He was commander of the First Armenian Cavalry Brigade from 1923–31. Baghramian attended the Frunze Military Academy from 1931–1934.

During World War II, Baghramian was the first non-Slavic military officer to become a commander of a Front. He was among several Armenians in the Soviet Army who held the highest proportion of high-ranking officers in the Soviet military during the war. Baghramian’s experience in military planning as a chief of staff allowed him to distinguish himself as a capable commander in the early stages of the Soviet counter-offensives against Nazi Germany. He was given his first command of a unit in 1942, and in November 1943 received his most prestigious command as the commander of the 1st Baltic Front. As commander of the Baltic Front, he participated in the offensives which pushed German forces out of the Baltic republics.

He did not immediately join the Communist Party after the consolidation of the October Revolution, becoming a member only in 1941, a move atypical for a Soviet military officer. After the war, he served as a deputy member of the Supreme Soviets of the Latvian Soviet Socialist Republic and Armenian Soviet Socialist Republic and was a regular attendee of the Party Congresses. In 1952, he became a candidate for entry into the Central Committee and, in 1961, was inducted as a full member. For his contributions during the war, he was widely regarded as a national hero in the Soviet Union, and continues to hold such esteemed status among Armenians.

Scholarships for 12-month Stay in Berlin

Deadline: December 15, 2012
Open to: Applicants from the USA, Great Britain, France and the former Soviet Union
Scholarship: 770 EUR per month for undergraduates and graduates, 1,300 EUR per month for post-docs

Description

The Study Foundation of the Berlin House of Representatives sponsors a scholarship program for young scholars of all fields. The program is directed to applicants from the USA, Great Britain, France and the former Soviet Union. Applicants should be working on research projects that require a 12 months stay in Berlin.

Scholarship

Undergraduates and graduates receive 770 EUR, postdocs 1,300 EUR per month. The scholarship includes travel costs to and from Berlin and free lodging in the International Study Center Berlin. The maximum age is 35 for postdocs and 25 years for undergraduates.

Application process

If you want to apply, please fill-in the application form. The completed application form has to be sent to studienstiftung@parlament-berlin.de. Please, fill-in the German language certificate too and send it to the same email address. The application deadline is December 15, 2012. The scholarship will begin on October 1, 2013 and end on September 30, 2014.

Contact information

Studienstiftung des Abgeordnetenhauses von Berlin
Niederkirchnerstr. 5
D-10111 Berlin
Tel. 0049 30 23252005
Fax: 0049 30 23252008
Email: studienstiftung@parlament-berlin.de

Visit the official website (Quicklink: Studienstiftung)

Read more: http://www.mladiinfo.com/2012/11/13/scholarships-for-12-month-stay-in-berlin/#ixzz2DQcOHGTf

source: ARMACAD

Scholarship program of the Berlin House of Representatives

The Study Foundation of the Berlin House of Representatives sponsors a scholarship program for young scholars of all fields. The program is directed to applicants from the USA, Great Britain, France and the former Soviet Union. Applicants should be working on research projects that require a 12 months stay in Berlin.
Undergraduates and graduates receive 770 EUR, postdocs 1,300 EUR per month. The scholarship includes travel costs to and from Berlin and free lodging in the International Study Center Berlin. The maximum age is 35 for postdocs and 25 years for undergraduates.

The application deadline is December 15, 2012. The scholarship will begin on October 1, 2013 and end on September 30, 2014.

Studienstiftung des Abgeordnetenhauses von Berlin
Niederkirchnerstr. 5
D-10111 Berlin
Tel. 0049 30 23252005
Fax: 0049 30 23252008
Email: studienstiftung@parlament-berlin.de
Email: studienstiftung@parlament-berlin.de
Visit the website at http://www.parlament-berlin.de (Quicklink: Studienstiftung)