Tag Archives: royalty

Legend of the First King of Armenia

The first Armenian who put the royal crown on his head was King Aram. On this occasion, his kingdom welcomed all the kings, princes and prominent visitors from neighbouring principalities and kingdoms. All were nobles and famous warriors.

After the coronation, the planned festivities began. Finally, when all the dishes, wines, and fruits had been consumed, the new king announced a competition in agility, strength and courage. The guests positioned themselves on the adjacent hill so they could enjoy the competition from an elevated point.

On the vast plain in front of them, they saw a herd of unbroken horses – forty wild stallions. The drover hit his whip and the herd rushed to the gorge. A group of noble riders rushed in to intercept the herd. Their horses cut the tall grass like lightning. Their lassoes shot up into the air and thirty-three out of forty horses were caught. But seven of the most spirited ones escaped the hunters.

Then brave Aram walked into the arena with a lasso in his hand. In two quick jumps, he reached the galloping horses and in one broad stroke of the lasso, he reined in all seven horses at once. One of his wise old friends, an expert on equestrian matters himself, was full of admiration for his skill, but still bent over to the king’s ear and asked: “Why, O King, have you lassoed all seven? After all, it was enough to catch one horse and it would become clear who the most skilled and powerful man is.”

The king without so much as turning his head replied: “Had I lassoed one or two, it might have looked like a coincidence. But if I got all seven, that’s a whole other matter. And there is yet another meaning to this. I am more than sure that after this event, none of our neighbours would dare to violate the borders of Armenia. And if they do, they will meet the same fate as these horses.”

“He is not only physically strong, but also wise,” thought the grey sage looking at his king proudly.

Marble Tombstone of Armenian Grand Prince

 

Marble tombstone of the Armenian Grand Prince Hasan Jalal Vahtangian (1214-1261)
File:Armenian Flag Khachen.gif
Royal Standard of the Principality of Khachen (Kingdom of Artsakh, Armenia) during the reign of Grand Prince Asan Jalal Vahtangian (1214-1261). At the center are the flag-wide “senior” white (silver) cross of St. John the Baptist and four “junior” crosses of St. John—symbols also used in the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia, Khachen’s ally state. The four traditional Armenian ecclesial abbreviations point to the words Jesus, Christ, Lord and God. The flag uses an intense shade of orange known in Armenian as Tzirani (literary—“color of apricot”) that symbolized nobility.

Info from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Hasan-Jalalyan

The House of Hasan-Jalalyan (Armenian: Հասան-Ջալալյաններ) was an Armenian dynasty that ruled the region of Khachen (Greater Artsakh) from 1214 onwards in what are now the regions of lower Karabakh, Nagorno-Karabakh and small part of Syunik. It was named after Hasan-Jalal Dawla (Հասան-Ջալալ Դոլա), an Armenian feudal prince from Khachen. The Hasan-Jalalyan family was able to maintain its autonomy throughout several centuries of foreign domination of the region by Seljuk Turks, Persians and Mongols as they, as well as the other Armenian princes and meliks of Khachen, saw themselves of holding the last bastion of Armenian independence in the region.

Through their many patronages of churches and other monuments, the Hasan-Jalalyans helped cultivate Armenian culture throughout the region. By the late 16th century, the Hasan-Jalalyan family had branched out to establish melikdoms in Gulistan and Jraberd, making them, along with Khachen, Varanda and Dizak, a part of what was then known as the “Melikdoms of Khamsa.”

Hasan-Jalal traced his descent to the Armenian Arranshahik dynasty, a family that predated the establishment of the Parthian Arsacids in the region. Hasan-Jalal’s ancestry was “almost exclusively” Armenian according to historian Robert H. Hewsen, a professor at Rowan University and an expert on the history of the Caucasus:

In the male line, (1) the princes (who later became kings) of Siunik. Through various princesses, who married his ancestors, Hasan-Jalal was descended from (2) the kings of Armenia or the Bagratuni Dynasty, centered at Ani; (3) the Armenian kings of Vaspurakan of the Artsruni dynasty, centered in the region ofVan; 4) the princes of Gardman; (5) the Sassanid dynasty of Persia, and (6) the Arsacids, the second royal house of Albania, itself a branch of (7) the kings of ancient Parthia.

Statues of Armenian Kings

Taken from PeopleofAr

Statue of Tiridat I of Armenia, erected in Rome in his honor by Emperor Nero in 66 CE (now in Louvre, Paris)

Marble sculpture of Tiridates I of Armenia, erected in Rome in his honor by Emperor Nero in 66 CE (now in Louvre museum, Paris)

Tiridates I of Armenia (reign: 63 AD). Statue: Versailles, France

Tiridates I of Armenia (reign: 63 AD). Statue: Versailles, France

 

Tiridates I of Armenia (reign: 63 AD). Statue: Versailles, France

Tiridates I of Armenia (reign: 63 AD). Statue: Versailles, France

Marble sculpture of Tigranes II (reign: 95-55 BC) in Versailles, France

Marble sculpture of Tigranes II (reign: 95-55 BC) in Versailles, France

Marble sculpture of Tigranes II (reign: 95-55 BC) in Versailles, France

Marble sculpture of Tigranes II (reign: 95-55 BC) in Versailles, France

Ancient Kharput

Arsamosata was a city in Armenian Sophene near the Euphrates, founded by King Arsames I of the Orontid Dynasty in the 3rd century BC. It was abandoned and destroyed in 1 century BC. In the Middle Ages, it was called Ashmushat. The city has been identified with the modern Kharput (Elazığ). It has also been identified as the abandoned settlement site known as Haraba, located some 60 km east of Elazig. Much of the site now lies submerged under the waters of the Keban dam.

Arsames I had taken control of Commagene, Sophene and Armenia in the year 260 BC after the death of his grandfather Orontes III, king of Armenia, and his father Sames, king of Commagene. The double death is quite suspicious, though no evidence of foul play has been proven true.